Workshop on Conservation Measures that Benefit Pollinators Applied under the Nature Directives in Natura 2000 Sites

 

Оn Wednesday, 13th November 2019,  a workshop on conservation measures that benefit pollinators applied under the Nature Directives in Natura 2000 sites took place in the Directorate-General for Environment (DG ENV) of the European Commission, Brussels, Belgium.

The event was organized by the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) European Regional Office. IUCN Europe provides key links to EU institutions and is the focal point for Europe’s nature policies and partnerships.

In recent years, public attention has been drawn to the plight of bee populations, which have seen losses across the EU and around the world. Behind this widely publicized phenomenon is a problem of a much larger scale, namely the drastic deterioration in the numbers and diversity of all European wild insect pollinators, including wild bees, marsupials, butterflies and moths. Many types of pollinators have disappeared or are threatened with extinction.
This is a serious concern, as pollinators are an integral part of healthy ecosystems. Without them, the status of many plant species would deteriorate and they would eventually disappear with their dependent organisms, with severe environmental, social and economic consequences.

The workshop moderator was Catarina Ferreira, European Biodiversity Conservation Coordinator. Experts from all European countries participated. A representative of the Via Pontica Foundation also took part.

 

 

The workshop started with “Introductory remarks and purpose of the workshop” by Micheal O’Briain (DG ENV, EC, Belgium). The following topics were discussed in the morning session:

-Overview of the EU Pollinators Initiative– Vujadin Kovacevic (DG ENV, EC, Belgium)

-Plant-pollinator network diversity in calcareous grasslands – Natasha de Manicor (University of Lille, France)

-Habitats action plans for calcareous grasslands (6210) and European dry heaths (4030) highlighting elements relevant for pollinators – Evelyn Underwood (IEEP, Belgium)

-Butterfly trends and conservation outside and within Natura 2000 sites – Irma Wynhoff (BCE, UK)

-Motivating site managers to implement pollinator friendly practices in Natura 2000 sites – Sébastien Husse (Parc Naturel Régional de Lorraine, France)

-Contributions of result based schemes to pollinators conservation in Natura 2000 sites : the case of the Tarnava Mare and Pogány Havas Regions in Romania – Răzvan Popa (Fundatia Adept, Romania)

-Biodiversity and specific conservation measures in agrarian landscapes to benefit pollinators. LIFE Food & Biodiversity – Vanessa Sánchez (Fundación Global Nature, Spain)

-Working with farmers to improve conditions for wild bees in Natura 2000 sites – Anne Erland Eskildsen (Danish Agriculture & Food Council F.m.b.A., SEGES) 

After lunch, breakout sessions took place. The approx. duration for each session was 40 min and each session comprised approx. 14 participants. The participants were rotated among the 3 breakout groups, thereby ensuring that they provide their insights to all of the questions. Each of the groups was composed of a mix of stakeholders. The goal of these moderated discussions and breakout groups was to identify best management practices for pollinators, synergies with private sector and local stakeholders, and discuss effectiveness and feasibility of conservation measures and management approaches applied in N2K sites under the Nature Directives for conservation of pollinators and their common habitats.

Inna Agafonova, founder and chairman of the board of the Via Pontica Foundation said that almost all participants concluded that it is important to improve the knowledge about pollinators and the causes and consequences of their deterioration and point to intensive agricultural management and use of pesticides as the most significant threats to pollinators. Other threats, such as urbanization, pollution, invasive alien species, diseases and climate change, were also identified as significant by most participants.

Experts at the seminar emphasized the restoration and maintenance of pollinator habitats in rural and urban environments and overcoming the pesticide-related threat to pollinators. The majority of experts identify the Habitats Directive and the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy as key instruments for the protection and support of pollinator habitats.

All participants in the seminar emphasized the importance of raising awareness, involving public participation in decisions and facilitating cooperation and sharing of knowledge, as well as the need for an EU initiative to support action at national, regional and local level.

 

 

Trump Begins Year-long Process to Formally Exit Paris Climate Agreement

  • Exit will not be final until day after 2020 elections
  • France and China to sign pact on ‘irreversibility’ of climate accord
Donald Trump announced his decision in June 2017 to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement. Photograph: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

 

Donald Trump is moving to formally exit the Paris climate agreement, making the United States the only country in the world that will not participate in the pact, as global temperatures are set to rise 3C and worsening extreme weather will drive millions into poverty.

The paperwork sent by the US government to withdraw begins a one-year process for exiting the deal agreed to at the UN climate change conference in Paris in 2015. The Trump administration will not be able to finalize its exit until a day after the presidential election in November 2020.

The French presidential office said Emmanuel Macron and Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping would sign a pact in Beijing on Wednesday that makes reference to the “irreversibility” of the Paris climate accord.

The Élysée palace official expressed disappointment at Trump’s move, saying: “We regret this and this only makes the Franco-Chinese partnership on the climate and biodiversity more necessary.”

The US secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, announced the development on Monday afternoon, saying the agreement would be an “unfair economic burden imposed on American workers, businesses and taxpayers” and that the US has already reduced its heat-trapping emissions.

But organizers of local city and state efforts to curb the crisis across America say the US is still trying to play a role in fighting the climate crisis, despite the actions of the federal government.

Carl Pope, vice chair of the group America’s Pledge, said its members – who are vowing to keep fighting the climate emergency – produce more than half the country’s heat-trapping emissions and represent about 70% of the US gross domestic product. Another organization, the US Climate Alliance, includes the governors of 25 states, representing 55% of the US population.

In the Paris agreement, the US agreed to cut its heat-trapping pollution at least 26% below 2005 levels by 2025.

 

Demonstrators protest Trump’s decision to exit the Paris climate agreement in June 2017. Photograph: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Staying on par with those more advanced countries would require the US government to eliminate pollution from coal and natural gas powered electricity plants, transportation, manufacturing facilities and agriculture. Local action by itself is not likely to be enough.

“We don’t think it’s likely just with the states we have, we think we need the whole country to be moving together,” Pope said.

Criticism from prominent political and environmental figures was swift and forceful.

The former vice-president and climate campaigner Al Gore said in a statement posted on Twitter: “No one person or party can stop our momentum to solve the climate crisis. But those who try will be remembered for their complacency, complicity, and mendacity in attempting to sacrifice the planet for their greed.”

Gore, a Nobel prize co-recipient (with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) for his efforts to raise awareness of the climate crisis, described Trump’s policy as “reckless” but also noted that the withdrawal process cannot start until after the 2020 election.

“Even if [Trump] follows through, it would take just 30 days for a new president to get us back in,” Gore added. “This decision is ultimately in the hands of the voters.”

The speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, called Trump’s move a “disastrous decision that sells out our children’s future”.

Jean Su, energy director with the Center for Biological Diversity’s Climate Law Institute, said: “America is the number one historical contributor to the climate emergency wreaking havoc in burning California, the flooded Southeast and the rest of the world.”

“The next president must repay this extraordinary climate debt by rapidly moving America to 100% clean energy and financing the decarbonization of the Global South,” Su said, referring to the developing world.

In addition, the Trump administration has also pulled US funding commitments to help the developing world cut pollution.

John Kerry and Chuck Hagel, president Barack Obama’s secretaries of state and defense respectively, in a Washington Post op-ed, called it a “dark day for America”.

Donald Trump’s administration has alternately ignored or denied the climate crisis. Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

 

“Climate change is already affecting every sector and region of the United States, as hundreds of top scientists from 13 federal agencies made clear in a report the White House itself released last year,” they said. “The past five years were the warmest ever recorded. Without steep pollution reductions, climate change will risk tens of thousands of US lives every year by the end of the century.”

 

 

They called the Paris agreement, “a start, not a finish line,” but “the best ignition switch the world could agree on to spark international cooperation on this critical issue”.

Senator Tom Carper, the top Democrat on the Senate environment panel, said: “Once again, President Trump is abandoning our global allies for the sake of misplaced political gain. Now America stands alone – nearly 200 countries have joined this global commitment to fighting climate change, even global pariahs like North Korea and civil war-torn countries like Syria.”

Carper said Trump is abandoning “tremendous economic opportunity” and public health benefits.

Trumphas alternately ignored or denied the climate crisis. His agencies are nixing regulations for power plants and cars, and bolstering fossil fuels whenever possible. He promised, to widespread dismay, to exit the Paris agreement during his campaign.

The Democratic 2020 election frontrunners challenging Trump have all said they would set the country on a path to neutralize its climate pollution by 2050.

 

Nate Hultman, director of the University of Maryland’s center for global sustainability and lead author of this year’s America’s Pledge report, pointed to new laws in New Mexico, Nevada, Washington, Maine, New York, Washington DC, and Puerto Rico for 100% clean energy targets. Hawaii and California already had such laws.

Together, they represent 16% of the nation’s electricity, more than doubling the share from 2018, he said.

“Another way to think about it is that Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris agreement is supported in reality by only about 30% of the economy and 35% of the population,” Hultman said.

Even once the US withdraws, the country can participate as an observer in international climate negotiations.

But despite the efforts of subnational governments, recent analysis shows the US is still far off track from its commitments, regardless of whether Trump pulled out.

The US is also far from neutralizing climate emissions by the middle of the century, which as many experts say will be necessary for all countries in order to avert the worst of the crisis.

“We can still get there with a serious shift in policy in the coming years,” said Kate Larsen, director of Rhodium’s international energy and climate research.

 

 

theguardian.com

Bulgaria in Second Place in EU in Recycling Plastic Packaging Waste – Eurostat

Bulgaria had the second-highest rate in the European Union in recycling plastic packaging waste in 2017, EU statistics agency Eurostat said on November 5.

This was above the estimated average for the EU of 42 per cent, Eurostat said.

Bulgaria had ranked fourth among EU member states in recycling plastic packaging waste in 2016, at 52.6 per cent.

In 2017, the highest recycling rate of plastic packaging waste in the EU was recorded in Lithuania (74 per cent).

Other countries above the EU average included Slovenia (60 per cent), Czech Republic (59 per cent), Slovakia (52 per cent) and the Netherlands (50 per cent).

In contrast, less than a third of plastic packaging waste was recycled in Malta (24 per cent, 2016 data), Estonia, France and Finland (each 27 per cent), Ireland (31 per cent), Hungary (32 per cent), Luxembourg and Austria (33 per cent).

Compared with 2005, the recycling rate of plastic packaging waste increased by 18 percentage points in the EU (from 24 per cent in 2005 to 42 per cent in 2017). This increasing trend is observed at varied levels in all EU member states, except Croatia, Eurostat said.

sofiaglobe.com

National Round Table “Sea – Border or Door”

 

On November 1, 2019, at 10:00 am, at the Flora Exhibition Center Burgas, for the eleventh time, a national round table “Sea – border or door” was held. The event brought together representatives of regional and local authorities, universities, educational structures, cultural institutes, non-governmental organizations and citizens.

The event’s patron, Assoc. Prof. Dr. Marusya Lyubcheva, Ms. Ruska Boyadzhieva, Deputy Mayor for European Policies and Environment, and Prof. Diana Radoynova, Member of the Academic Staff of the ITU – “Assen Zlatarov” – Burgas, opened the event and gave tone of a friendly conversation about the challenges, benefits and resources of the Black Sea basin.

The team of the Via Pontica Foundation presented the project project Innovative Techniques and Methods for Reducing Marine Litter in the Black Sea Coastal Areas”, priority 2.2. “Awareness Raising and Joint Actions for Reducing River and Marine Litter, Joint Operational Programme “Black Sea Basin 2014-2020” (BSB552 RedMarLitter) as part of the panel on environment and eco-innovation.

 

 

The discussion raised the issues of cooperation in the Black Sea region by developing a blue economy and participating in local fisheries initiative groups. Unconventional topics such as urban maritime culture and rare artifacts from the region were highlighted, revealing the diversity of creative economic and cultural opportunities for achievement.

The aptly-chosen date, on National Enlighteners Day and after the International Black Sea Day, successfully combined the ideas of synergy and impulse to work in the areas of research accessibility and integrated maritime policy through innovation.

The articles and research presented at the conference will be published in a special collection.

Information Meeting on the Effects on the Black Sea Caused by Marine Litter

 

 

On October 30, 2019, on the eve of the International Black Sea Day, the Black Sea Basin Directorate of the Ministry of Environment and Water (MOEW) organized an Information Meeting to raise awareness of the consequences for the marine environment, caused by marine waste at the Sea Casino Cultural Center, city of Burgas.

Experts from the MOEW, National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology (NIMH) at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (BAS), Green Balkans Wildlife Rescue Center and the Via Pontica Foundation, as well as representatives of the business sector and the general public took part in it .

The Coordinator of the project Innovative Techniques and Methods for Reducing Marine Litter in the Black Sea Coastal Areas”, priority 2.2. “Awareness Raising and Joint Actions for Reducing River and Marine Litter, Joint Operational Programme “Black Sea Basin 2014-2020”, Ms. Ana Yancheva, from the Via Pontica Foundation presented the progress and the expected results of the actions undertaken by the Via Pontica Foundation together with the Burgas Municipality partner on the Measure 5 of the Marine Strategy of the Republic of Bulgaria.

She announced that alongside the main activities of the Project, in support of the targeted policy to reduce the pollution of the Black Sea and coastal regions, the Via Pontica Foundation and the Municipality of Burgas regularly organize educational campaigns and seminars for children, students, and the general public to promote and popularize the pollution prevention activities and to clean beach / coastlines through volunteer participation and production of information materials (posters, brochures, leaflets, etc.) and distribution videos through the redmarlitter.eu, viapontica.org and mass media websites.

Measure No 5 concerns the coordinated organization / support of annual business awareness campaigns (merchants, beach concessionaires, beach service users, fishermen, etc.) and the public (tourists, students, children, etc.), with regard to the consequences for the marine environment caused by marine litter and the need for their recycling.

The Green Balkans WRC presented the project ” CeNoBS – Support MSFD implementation in the Black Sea through establishing a regional monitoring system of cetaceans (D1) and noise monitoring (D11) for achieving GES, launched at the beginning of this year and united the efforts of partners from Bulgaria, Monaco, Romania, Ukraine and Turkey.

Professor Dr. Jordan Marinsky (NIMH) announces the results and forthcoming tasks ahead of the project “Environmental Protection of Areas Surrounding Ports Using Innovative Learning Tools for Legislation” – ECOPORTIL, which is about to end October this year. The leading partner of the project is the Technological Educational Institute of Epirus, Greece, and partners are: Port Infrastructure DP, Bulgaria, University of the Aegean, Greece, National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology – Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria, Maritime Institute of the Eastern Mediterranean, Cyprus and Transport Institute, Albania.

The Municipality of Burgas, represented by Ms. Maya Ruseva, Director of the European Policies and Programs Directorate, shared best practices and serious steps taken to limit plastic products among employees and subcontractors, involved in the activities and projects of the Municipality.

It is recognized as a good example the creation of a series of events on similar topics to share experiences and good practices regarding the environmental and human health consequences of marine wastes and the need for their recycling.

The themes have caused many comments and have led to a heated discussion on the raising awareness and promoting action to protect the Black Sea.

 

 

Circular Attack against Plastics

More than 100 public and private sector partners operating throughout the plastics chain have signed in Brussels the Circular Plastics Alliance – Declaration, which promotes voluntary action to support a well-functioning recycled plastics market in the EU.

The vision of the Circular Plastics Alliance is to deliver on the circular economy for plastics and substantially increase the use of recycled plastics into new products.

Thе Alliance, endorses the ambitious target that by 2025 at least 10 million tonnes of recycled plastics should find their way into products and packaging in Europe each year; referred to as “the 10 million tonnes target”, helping to deliver the circular economy with a life cycle approach. This opens up the possibility of the EU becoming a global leader in recycled plastics – a factor for protecting the environment, creating jobs and maintaining competitiveness.

The declaration, which is signed by small and medium-sized enterprises, large corporations, business associations, standardizers, research organizations and local and national authorities, calls for zero plastic waste in the wild and zero landfill of plastics. It provides specific actions to achieve the objective:

-improving the design of plastic products so that they are fit for use

-recycling and use of more recycled plastics;

– identification of sites with untapped potential for more active collection, sorting

-and recycling of plastic waste across the EU and those with a lack of investment;

-the development of a program of research and development in the field of

-circular use of plastics;

– building a transparent and reliable system for monitoring plastic waste streams in the EU.

Business associations and companies are also invited to submit engagements for the use or production of more recycled plastics.

 

Reserves

The potential for recycling plastic waste in the EU is still largely unused, especially compared to other materials such as paper, glass or metal. Of the 27 million tonnes of plastic waste collected each year in Europe, less than a third reach recycling plants. As a result, less than 4 million tonnes of recycled plastics were sold in Europe in 2016, which is only 8% of the EU plastics market.

The Circular Plastics Alliance is committed to helping to expand the EU recycled plastics market by more than 15%.

The Circular Plastics Alliance identifies five topics as priorities:

1. Collection and sorting of plastic waste;

2. Design solutions for recycling;

3. Content of recycled plastic in the products;

4. R&D and investments, including chemical recycling;

5. Monitoring of recycled plastics in the EU.

 

economynews.bg

The First Garbage Islands Have Been Discovered in the Black Sea

 

 

The first islands from the trash can be seen in the Black Sea. ”The findings are unique and disturbing, because similar shapes have become noticeable till now in the widths of large oceans”, it writes in the Telegraph, based on publications of the Russian websites.

Giant clusters of litter in the water were seen by a group of Russian scientists who came to the sea to count the dolphin population, they report from the A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The expedition used a twin-engine La 8 flying ship, an eight-seater amphibious aircraft, on which the dolphins were monitored at sea from 18 to 26 September 2019.

“450 times scientists caught sight of the garbage islands – large and small. Swam as simple packages, as well as individual plastic structures, scraps of nets and buoys. Often, small debris was concentrated in huge spots over which the plane flew for several minutes, ”said Dmitry Glazov, head of the research team of the project “ Flights with dolphins ”, leading engineer of the A. N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

According to the scientists from the BAN, the garbage that formed the most probably came from the Danube River, which is the main source of pollution in the Black Sea.
The second destination is the ship traffic, which also generates waste, and such can be seen on the route of many vessels.

Sources:
meduzata.com
interfax.ru

An Innovative Black Sea Pollution Database

 

On September 25, 2019, an innovative online platform providing data on the Black Sea currents and marine litter pollution was presented at the Flora Exposition Center in Burgas. The platform is designed so that data can be added to it by both scientific organizations and individual citizens who have monitored the waste. The system will enable the marine litter pollution to be tracked in a more complete and accessible way and will support both the research in the area and volunteering for the Black Sea.

 

 

The platform was developed by the team under the project “ Innovative Techniques and Methods for Reducing Marine Litter in the Black Sea Coastal Areas” (BSB552 RedMarLitter), in which the leading partner, the Via Pontica Foundation, teams with the Municipality of Burgas and two universities – “Ovidius” from Constanta, Romania and Tbilisi State University, Georgia and covers data from the three countries. Subsequently, it is expected to be supplemented by data from other Black Sea countries.

The presentation of the online database was part of the second monitoring meeting on the project BSB552 RedMarLitter, which was held from 24-26 September 2019.

 

 

The project is implemented by priority 2.2. “ Awareness Raising and Joint Actions for Reducing River and Marine Litter”, Joint Operational Programme “Black Sea Basin 2014-2020”.

In addition to the ongoing project procedures, the representatives from all stakeholder groups had the opportunity to participate in a monitoring campaign. In line with the current interactive approach on September 25, 2019 starting at 10 am on the beach north of Burgas Salt Lakes, in collaboration with the Naval Academy “N. Y. Vaptsarov” a demonstration of the on-site work and presentation of techniques and methods of conducting a monitoring campaign was conducted.

 

 

Open discussions with experts and partners sharing valuable feedback in exchange knowledge regarding the progress of the planned activities and the presentation of the created computer-based platform for marine waste monitoring were the focus of the meeting.

 

 

Next on the agenda, is the implementation of the updated managerial and procurement plan. The participation of external contractors, regional experts, local and academic authorities was highly appreciated by the team of all RedMarLitter partners.

 

Horrifying Report: The Ocean Is in More Danger Than We Thought

The UN’s latest IPCC report looks at how climate change is affecting the water on our planet and finds that sea level rise, animal habitat destruction, and dangerous storms are all happening—and all making each other worse.

 

[Photo: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, andrej67/iStock, Per Bjørkum/Unsplash, johnnorth/iStock]

 

Each year, as humans emit billions of metric tons of CO2 into the atmosphere, nearly a third of the emissions ends up in the ocean, changing the chemical balance of the water. And as the climate changes, the ocean is also absorbing almost all of the Earth’s extra heat, melting ice that creates sea level rise, making the water uninhabitable for marine life, and changing the planet’s weather patterns. A new report from the IPCC, the UN panel that studies climate change, lays out exactly what’s at stake for the ocean as a result—and for humans, all of whom rely on the ocean either directly or indirectly.

“What comes out of this report is that it’s going to hit us in so many ways,” says Mark Spalding, senior marine scientist for The Nature Conservancy, one of the organizations that contributed to the report. The litany of potential disasters from a changing ocean is horrifying: As the warming water melts ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica, the sea level rises each year, putting hundreds of millions of people who live in low-lying coastal areas at risk of flooding. A warmer ocean supercharges hurricanes. Marine heatwaves can boost toxic algae and close fisheries. As the water absorbs CO2, it becomes more acidic, posing another threat to coral reefs. And all these impacts can exacerbate each other—coral reefs, for example, “play the role of a sea wall,” says Spalding.

“They sit offshore like a barrier and they break waves before the waves get to land.” As storms get stronger, this natural protection is being lost at the same time.For marine ecosystems, these threats are piling up on top of other human impacts. “A lot of the other damage we’ve done to habitats is making the threat of climate change worse,” he says.

“We overfish, we damage coral reefs, we pollute. This idea that humans are adding to the problem comes out quite clearly in this report. The flip side to that is that we can do something about it. If we can reduce some of these parallel problems, we can at least buy ourselves some time to deal with the climate change piece of this.”

The Nature Conservancy, for example, is working on projects to restore coral reefs and other marine ecosystems, as in a project in the Caribbean that created an insurance policy for coral reefs; hotels in the area pay a premium each month so that if a storm hits, the funding can immediately be used to rebuild the reefs to protect the hotels. Other projects are restoring mangroves, a coastal ecosystem that is uniquely good at sucking carbon from the air.

The biggest change that needs to happen, of course, is a move to a zero-carbon economy. “What happens depends on what decisions we make now and in the next few years,” says Spalding. “Do we follow a business-as-usual path? Or do we really knock it down and try to aim for [warming of just] 1.5 degrees?” The difference between limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, instead of 2 degrees, might sound small. But it’s actually huge.

“It’s startlingly different between one and the other. The lowest emission scenario is still talking about just one meter of sea level rise in a couple of hundred years’ time. With a high-emissions scenario, we’re talking about multiple meters of sea level rise, which frankly is curtains for entire nations—even wealthy nations and cities that are on the coast.”

 

By Adele Peters

fastcompany.com

INNOVATIVE DATABASE FOR MARINE LITTER POLLUTION OF THE BLACK SEA WILL BE PRESENTED IN BURGAS

On September 25, 2019, an innovative online platform providing data on the Black Sea currents and marine litter pollution will be presented at the Flora Exposition Center in Burgas. The platform is designed so that data can be added to it by both scientific organizations and individual citizens who have monitored the waste. The system will enable the marine litter pollution to be tracked in a more complete and accessible way and will support both the research in the area and volunteering for the Black Sea.

The platform was developed by the team under the project “Innovative techniques and methods for reducing marine litter in the Black Sea coastal areas” (BSB552 RedMarLitter), in which the leading partner, Via Pontica Foundation, teams with the Municipality of Burgas and two universities – “Ovidius” from Constanta, Romania and Tbilisi State University, Georgia and covers data from the three countries. Subsequently, it is expected to be supplemented by data from other Black Sea countries.

The presentation of the online database is part of the second monitoring meeting on the project BSB552 RedMarLitter, which will be held from 24-26 September 2019.

The project is implemented by priority 2.2. “Awareness Raising and Joint Actions for Reducing River and Marine Litter”, Joint Operational Programme “Black Sea Basin 2014-2020”.

In addition to the ongoing project procedures, representatives from all stakeholder groups will have the opportunity to participate in a monitoring campaign. In line with the current non-standard approach on September 25, 2019 starting at 10 am on the beach north of Burgas Salt Lakes, in collaboration with the Naval Academy “N. Y. Vaptsarov” will be demonstrated on-site work and presentation of techniques and methods of conducting a monitoring campaign.

The event will continue with a presentation panel at the Flora Exhibition Center, Burgas, where in open discussions the experts and partners will have the opportunity to exchange knowledge in connection with the progress of the planned activities and the presentation of the created computer-based platform for marine waste monitoring.

 

 

Contact details for more information:
Anna Yancheva
Project Coordinator
Mobile: +359 899 840 138
Email: [email protected]